Advertisement

Thinking in Poetry: Heidegger on Memorialising and Dis-closure; Vergil and Comprehensiveness

  • John G. Fitch
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Literature, Science and Medicine book series (PLSM)

Abstract

The processes of thinking in poetry have been investigated by Helen Vendler and Jonathan Kertzer. From that starting-point, this chapter pursues Martin Heidegger’s identification of certain characteristics of thinking in poetry, in particularly memorialising and dis-closure. It argues that memorialising thought is not inherently opposed to science; and that dis-closure occurs not only in poetry but also in science—witness the Eureka syndrome. It also makes connections between memorialising and memory: for the Greeks, poetry was the province of the Muses, who were daughters of Memory (Mnemosyne). Finally the chapter discusses the comprehensiveness of poetic thinking, exemplifying this quality in Vergil’s Georgics.

Keywords

Heidegger Memorialising Dis-closure Dawkins Vergil 

References

  1. Altevogt, H. 1952. Labor improbus. Eine Vergilstudie. Münster: Aschendorff.Google Scholar
  2. Bové, Paul A. 1980. Destructive Poetics. New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
  3. Burnell, Jocelyn Bell. 2006. Astronomy and Poetry. In Contemporary Poetry and Contemporary Science, ed. Robert Crawford, 125–140. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Google Scholar
  4. Chandrasekhar, S. 1987. Truth and Beauty: Aesthetics and Motivations in Science. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  5. Crawford, Robert (ed.). 2006. Contemporary Poetry and Contemporary Science. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  6. Dawkins, Richard. 1998. Unweaving the Rainbow: Science, Delusion and the Appetite for Wonder. Boston and New York: Allen Lane.Google Scholar
  7. Heidegger, Martin. 1961. An Introduction to Metaphysics, trans. Ralph Mannheim. New York: Doubleday.Google Scholar
  8. Heidegger, Martin. 1962. Being and Time, trans. John Macquarrie and Edward Robinson. New York: Harper and Row.Google Scholar
  9. Herbert, W.N. 2006. Testament and Confessions of an Informationist. In Contemporary Poetry and Contemporary Science, ed. Robert Crawford, 72–87. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Google Scholar
  10. Kertzer, Jonathan. 1988. Poetic Argument. Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press.Google Scholar
  11. Lake, Paul. 2001. The Shape of Poetry. In The Measured Word: On Poetry and Science, ed. Kurt Brown, 156–180. Athens: University of Georgia. Google Scholar
  12. MacDiarmid, Hugh. 1992. Selected Poems. Manchester: Carcanet.Google Scholar
  13. MacLeod, Norman. 2006. Introduction. In Contemporary Poetry and Contemporary Science, ed. Robert Crawford, 141–142. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  14. McGann, Jerome J. 1989. Towards a Literature of Knowledge. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  15. Pound, Ezra. 1928. A Draft of the Cantos 17–27. London: John Rodker.Google Scholar
  16. Pound, Ezra. 1934. The ABC of Reading. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  17. Thomas, Richard F. (ed.). 1988. Virgil: Georgics, 2 vols. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  18. Vendler, Helen. 2004. Poets Thinking: Pope, Whitman, Dickinson, Yeats. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of VictoriaVictoriaCanada

Personalised recommendations