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Resources for Global Ethics Education

Chapter
Part of the Advancing Global Bioethics book series (AGBIO, volume 10)

Abstract

As we continue to grow as global community we need resources that focus specifically on global ethics issues, and available—or lack of available—resources makes it clear that the time has come for ethics to embrace a global perspective. This chapter provides a survey of resources currently available to facilitate educational experiences in global ethics. Practitioners as well as educators will find resources including specific print and digital media as well as databases, repositories, film collections, centers and teaching tools. The chapter concludes with current evidence-based pedagogical practices in ethics education that can be adapted to global ethics education.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Carlow UniversityPittsburghUSA

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