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Designing and Testing Credibility: The Case of a Serious Game on Nightlife Risks

  • Luciano Gamberini
  • Massimo Nucci
  • Luca Zamboni
  • Giovanni DeGiuli
  • Sabrina Cipolletta
  • Claudia Villa
  • Valeria Monarca
  • Mafalda Candigliota
  • Giuseppe Pirotto
  • Stephane Leclerq
  • Anna Spagnolli
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 10809)

Abstract

This paper describes a game directed to young adults and aimed at sensitizing them about potential risks of psychoactive substance abuse during nightlife events. Of interest here is that this game targets a domain in which the credibility of a persuasive intervention is particularly fragile. The design decisions and the recommendations inspiring them are described first, characterized by an effort to fit the context in which the game was going to be used. In addition, a field study with real users during nightlife events is reported (N = 136), in which several dimensions of the game credibility are evaluated and compared with the credibility of a serious information tool (leaflets) in a between-participant design. By describing this case, the opportunity is taken to emphasize the importance of serious games credibility, and to enumerate some of the occasions to improve its strength that can be found during its design to evaluation.

Keywords

Short intervention Serious games Nightlife well-being Credibility 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The study described here was partially supported by the European Commission, via the Nightlife, Empowerment and Well-being Implementation (NEW-IP, no. 29299) project. The funding body did not affect the authors’ decisions about the study design, collection, analysis and interpretation of data, the writing of the report, or the decision to submit the article for publication.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Luciano Gamberini
    • 1
    • 3
  • Massimo Nucci
    • 1
    • 3
  • Luca Zamboni
    • 1
    • 3
  • Giovanni DeGiuli
    • 2
    • 3
  • Sabrina Cipolletta
    • 1
    • 3
  • Claudia Villa
    • 2
    • 3
  • Valeria Monarca
    • 2
    • 3
  • Mafalda Candigliota
    • 1
    • 3
  • Giuseppe Pirotto
    • 1
    • 3
  • Stephane Leclerq
    • 2
    • 3
  • Anna Spagnolli
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of General PsychologyUniversity of PadovaPadovaItaly
  2. 2.Psicologi Senza Frontiere ONLUSPadovaItaly
  3. 3.ABD - Energy ControlBarcelonaSpain

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