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Clients and Therapeutic Agents: Court Selection and Team Dynamics

Chapter

Abstract

This chapter illustrates the key principles of Mental Health Courts (MHCs) in the two case study sites detailing the selection process, treatment plans, conditions of probation, and the services offered to those opting-into the court. The chapter reveals how clients decide to opt-in or opt-out of the MHC and the ways in which some involuntarily get catch in the web of MHC. It details the MHC team members and specifically considers the role of the judge and other members of the team as therapeutic agents in dispensing therapeutic justice.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Seattle Pacific UniversitySeattleUSA

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