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Copper

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Abstract

Copper is a commonly-encountered metal and most people would easily recognize a piece. So the perception may be that it is common metal, but it is not. It comprises only 0.0068% of the Earth’s crust. By comparison, iron and aluminum are 6.3% and 8.1% of the Earth’s crust, respectively. The name copper comes from the Latin name aes cyprium or the “Cypriot metal”, which later became cuprum – Cyprus being a major source of copper in Roman times. Elemental copper, which is a reddish-orange color face-centered cubic metal (like aluminum), is one of only four colored metals – the others are the bluish element osmium, and the yellow-colored gold and cesium.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    http://periodictable.com/Properties/A/CrustAbundance.an.html

  2. 2.

    https://www.webelements.com/copper/

  3. 3.

    http://www.tibtech.com/conductivity.php

  4. 4.

    Landmarks Preservation Commission, September 14, 1976, number 1, LP-0931.

  5. 5.

    The Economist, August 5th, 2017.

References

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Baker, I. (2018). Copper. In: Fifty Materials That Make the World. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-78766-4_9

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