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Decreased Composite Indices of Femoral Neck Strength in Young Obese Women

  • Abdel-Jalil Berro
  • Said Ahmaidi
  • Antonio Pinti
  • Abir Alwan
  • Hayman Saddik
  • Joseph Matta
  • Fabienne Frenn
  • Maroun Rizkallah
  • Ghassan Maalouf
  • Rawad El Hage
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 10814)

Abstract

The aim of the current study was to compare compression strength index (CSI), bending strength index (BSI) and impact strength index (ISI) among obese, overweight and normal-weight young women. 117 young women (20 obese, 36 overweight and 61 normal-weight) whose ages range from 18 to 35 years participated in this study. Body composition and BMD were evaluated by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). CSI, BSI and ISI values were significantly lower in obese and overweight women compared to normal-weight women (p < 0.001). In the whole population (n = 117), body mass index (BMI) was negatively correlated to CSI (r = −0.66; p < 0.001), BSI (r = −0.56; p < 0.001) and ISI (r = −0.54; p < 0.001). This study suggests that obesity is associated with lower CSI, BSI and ISI values in young women.

Keywords

Bone strength Fracture risk Hip geometry 

Notes

Conflicts of Interest

The authors state that they have no conflicts of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Abdel-Jalil Berro
    • 1
    • 2
  • Said Ahmaidi
    • 2
  • Antonio Pinti
    • 8
  • Abir Alwan
    • 1
    • 3
  • Hayman Saddik
    • 1
    • 8
  • Joseph Matta
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
    • 6
  • Fabienne Frenn
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
  • Maroun Rizkallah
    • 3
    • 4
    • 7
  • Ghassan Maalouf
    • 7
  • Rawad El Hage
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Physical Education, Faculty of Arts and Social SciencesUniversity of BalamandEl-KouraLebanon
  2. 2.EA-3300, APERE, Sport Sciences Department, University of Picardie Jules VerneAmiensFrance
  3. 3.Movement, Sport and Health Sciences Laboratory (M2S), UFR-APS, University of Rennes 2-ENS CachanRennesFrance
  4. 4.Laboratoire VIP’S, UFR-APS, Campus la Harpe, Université Rennes 2RennesFrance
  5. 5.Industrial Research InstituteBeirutLebanon
  6. 6.Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of NutritionSaint Joseph UniversityBeirutLebanon
  7. 7.Faculty of Medicine, Bellevue University Medical CenterSaint Joseph UniversityMansouriehLebanon
  8. 8.I3MTO, University of OrléansOrléansFrance

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