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Definitions and Conceptions of Giftedness Around the World

  • Anies Al-HroubEmail author
  • Sara El Khoury
Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Psychology book series (BRIEFSPSYCHOL)

Abstract

This chapter presents a critical review on the international definitions of giftedness and teachers’ perceptions of giftedness around the world, in order to have a better understanding and assessment of where Lebanon stands. This chapter also sheds light on how different cultures perceive giftedness. Moreover, misconceptions and misdiagnoses of gifted children are explored, along with stereotypes that are popular around the world.

Keywords

Teachers’ conceptions Definitions Underrepresentation Giftedness and culture Nurturing giftedness Gender Characteristics Intellectual ability Academic performance Creativity Leadership 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Education, ChairpersonAmerican University of BeirutBeirutLebanon
  2. 2.Department of EducationAmerican University of BeirutJouniehLebanon

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