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Transnational Education in the Vietnamese Market: Paradoxes and Possibilities

  • Nhai NguyenEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Higher Education Dynamics book series (HEDY, volume 51)

Abstract

In Vietnam changes in the global and national policy landscapes, the urge for global integration, the need to improve higher education quality, and the increasing number of Vietnamese school-leavers opting for higher education opportunities have fuelled the demand for transnational education (TNE). And yet, TNE has neither been documented sufficiently in the literature nor approached thoroughly from a different angle, allowing a comprehensive inquiry into the global, national and local forces which have implicitly informed the Vietnam education market. Equally, while Australian international education has propelled that country’s economy by AUD 19.2 billion and ranked as Australia’s the biggest service export industry (The Australian 2016), little has been done to look in depth at Australian transnational education, outside its borders and subject to the complex network of global and local forces and multiple actors. Most of the current research on TNE centres on quality assurance, the downsides of TNE commercialisation, the regulatory environments, teaching and learning and the business models of branch campuses. This chapter opens the TNE space to critical analysis of the provision of international higher education by foreign institutions in Vietnam. It argues that the discourse of the Vietnamese TNE market should not be reduced to a superficial analysis of market structures. Rather, it must be extended to a critical discourse of market relations where hidden connectivities, complexities and unique characteristics set it apart from other types of market. The chapter contributes a comprehensive analysis of the marketisation of TNE in Vietnam, drawing out implications for critical inquiry in this field and in relation to the TNE policy making landscape.

Keywords

Transnational education Marketisation Education market Market structure Market relations 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Monash UniversityMelbourneAustralia

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