Advertisement

The Older, the Better? The Role of Hope for the Regulation of Subjective Well-Being Over Life-Span

  • Pasqualina Perrig-ChielloEmail author
  • Stefanie Spahni
  • Katja Margelisch
Chapter
Part of the Social Indicators Research Series book series (SINS, volume 72)

Abstract

Despite the increase of theoretical and empirical work on subjective well-being, research addressing the relation between hope and various dimensions of well-being from a life-span approach is still scarce. Based on original data of the Hope-Barometer 2015, this contribution aims at closing some research gaps by focussing on the question on how hope, well-being and age are related, and on how dispositional hope can predict life satisfaction, happiness and meaning in life and explain their variance. Results show a significant age-related increase for all well-being and dispositional hope parameters. Our data confirm furthermore the dominant role of hope for predicting meaning in life and life satisfaction over all age groups. Nonetheless, optimism also has a non-negligible impact on well-being outcomes, essentially for happiness and to a lesser extent for life satisfaction. These insights are not only scientific relevant, but entail important practical implications for designing interventions and psychological education.

References

  1. Alarcon, G. M., Bowling, N. A., & Khazon, S. (2013). Great expectations: A meta-analytic examination of optimism and hope. Personality and Individual Differences, 54, 821–827.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Bailey, T. C., & Snyder, C. R. (2007). Satisfaction with life and hope: A look at age and marital status. The Psychological Record, 57, 233–240.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Boehm, J. K., & Kubzansky, L. D. (2012). The heart’s content: The association between positive psychological well-being and cardiovascular health. Psychological Bulletin, 138, 655–691.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Bryant, F. B., & Cvengros, J. A. (2004). Distinguishing hope and optimism: Two sides of a coin, or two separate coins? Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology, 23(2), 273–302.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Ciarrochi, J., Parker, P., Kashdan, T. B., Heaven, P. C. L., & Barkus, E. (2015). Hope and emotional well-being: A six-year study to distinguish antecedents, correlates, and consequences. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 10(6), 520–532.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Cohen, J. (1969). Statistical power analysis for the behavioral sciences. San Diego, CA: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  7. Diener, E. D., Emmons, R. A., Larsen, R. J., & Griffin, S. (1985). The satisfaction with life scale. Journal of Personality Assessment, 49(1), 71–75.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Ehrler, F., Bühlmann, F., Höpflinger, F., Joye, D., Perrig-Chiello, P., & Suter, C. (2016). Sozialbericht 2016: Wohlbefinden. Zürich, Switzerland: Seismo.Google Scholar
  9. Feldman, D. B., & Dreher, D. E. (2012). Can hope be changed in 90 minutes? Testing the efficacy of a single-session goal-pursuit intervention for college students. Journal of Happiness Studies, 13, 745–759.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Gallagher, M. W., & Lopez, S. J. (2009). Positive expectancies and mental health: Identifying the unique contributions of hope and optimism. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 4, 548–556.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Heaven, P., & Ciarrochi, J. (2008). Parental styles, gender and the development of hope and self-esteem. European Journal of Personality, 22(8), 707–724.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. IBM Corp. Released (2014). IBM SPSS Statistics for Windows, Version 23.0. Armonk, NY: IBM Corp.Google Scholar
  13. Jackson, L. T. B., van de Vijver, F. J. R., & Fouché, R. (2014). Psychological strengths and subjective well-being in South African white students. Journal of Psychology in Africa, 24(4), 299–307.Google Scholar
  14. Jafari, E., Najafi, M., Sohrabi, F., Dehshiri, G. R., Soleymani, E., & Heshmati, R. (2010). Life satisfaction, spirituality well-being and hope in cancer patients. Procedia – Social and Behavioral Sciences, 5, 1362–1366.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Kornadt, A. E., Voss, P., & Rothermund, K. (2015). Hope for the best, prepare for the worst? Future self-views and preparation for age-related changes. Psychology and Aging, 30(4), 967–976.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Kortte, K. B., Stevenson, J. E., Hosey, M. M., Castillo, R., & Wegener, S. T. (2012). Hope predicts positive functional role outcomes in acute rehabilitation populations. Rehabilitation Psychology, 57, 248–255.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Luhmann, M., Hofmann, W., Eid, M., & Lucas, R. E. (2012). Subjective well-being and adaptation to life events: A meta-analysis on differences between cognitive and affective well-being. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 102(3), 592–615.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Lyubomirsky, S., & Lepper, H. S. (1999). A measure of subjective happiness: Preliminary reliability and construct validation. Social Indicators Research, 46(2), 137–155.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Marques, S. C., Lopez, S. H., & Pais-Ribeiro, J. L. (2011). “Building hope for the future”: A program to foster strengths in middle-school students. Journal of Happiness Studies, 12, 139–152.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Martínez-Marti, M. L., & Ruch, W. (2014). Character strengths and well-being across the life span: Data from a representative sample of German-speaking adults living in Switzerland. Frontiers of Psychology, 5, 1–10.Google Scholar
  21. McGrath, R. E., Rashid, T., Park, N., & Peterson, C. (2010). Is optimal functioning a distinct state? The Humanistic Psychologist, 38, 159–169.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Parse, R. (1999). Hope: An international human becoming perspective. Boston: Jones and Bartlett.Google Scholar
  23. Perrig-Chiello, P. (2011). Glücklich oder bloss zufrieden? Hintergründe und Fakten zum Paradoxon des Wohlbefindens im Alter. In A. Holenstein, R. Meyer Schweizer, P. Perrig-Chiello, et al. (Eds.), Glück. Berner Universitätsschriften (pp. 241–255). Bern, CH: Haupt.Google Scholar
  24. Perrig-Chiello, P. (2016). Glück und Zufriedenheit im Alter. Punktum. Zeitschrift des Schweizerischen Berufsverbandes für Angewandte Psychologie, 2, 18–20.Google Scholar
  25. Perrig-Chiello, P., & Hutchison, S. (2010). Health and well-being in old age – The pertinence of a gender mainstreaming approach in research. Gerontology, 56(2), 208–213.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Ryff, C. (1995). The structure of psychological well-being revisited. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 69(4), 719–727.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Ryff, C. D. (2014). Psychological well-being revisited: advances in science and practice. Psychotherapy & Psychosomatics, 83(1), 10–28.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Schumacher, J. (2003). SWLS–satisfaction with life scale. In U. Ravens-Sieberer & M. Bullinger (Eds.), Diagnostische Verfahren zu Lebensqualität und Wohlbefinden (pp. 305–309). Goettingen, DE: Hogrefe.Google Scholar
  29. Snyder, C. R. (2002). Hope theory: Rainbows in the mind. Psychological Inquiry, 13, 249–275.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Snyder, C. R., Irving, L. M., & Anderson, J. R. (1991). Handbook of social and clinical psychology: The health perspective, Pergamon General Psychology Series, 162. Richmond, VA: Pergamon.Google Scholar
  31. Snyder, C. R., Lehman, K. A., Kluck, B., & Monsson, Y. (2006). Hope for rehabilitation and vice versa. Rehabilitation Psychology, 51, 89–112.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Snyder, C. R., Lopez, S. J., Shorey, H. S., Rand, K. L., & Feldman, D. B. (2003). Hope: Theory, measurements and applications to school psychology. School Psychology Quarterly, 18(2), 122–139.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Steel, M. (2016). Measuring national well-being: At what age is personal well-being the highest? UK Office of National Statistics. Retrieved August, 26, 2017, from https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/wellbeing/articles/measuringnationalwellbeing/atwhatageispersonalwellbeingthehighest
  34. Steger, M. F., Frazier, P., Oishi, S., & Kaler, M. (2006). The meaning in life questionnaire: Assessing the presence of and search for meaning in life. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 53(1), 80–93.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Steptoe, A., Deaton, A., & Stone, A. A. (2015). Psychological wellbeing, health and ageing. Lancet, 385(9968), 640–648.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Stone, A., Schwartz, J. E., Broderick, J. E., & Deaton, A. (2010). A snapshot of the age distribution of psychological well-being in the United States. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA, 107(22), 9985–9990.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Sung, Y., Turner, S. L., & Kaewchinda, M. (2013). Career development skills, outcomes, and hope among college students. Journal of Career Development, 40(2), 127–145.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. Sutin, A. R., Terracciano, A., Milaneschi, Y., An, Y., Ferrucci, L., & Zonderman, A. B. (2013). Cohort effects on well-being: The legacy of economic hard times. Psychological Science, 24(3), 379–385.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Tutton, E., Seers, K., & Langstaff, D. (2009). An exploration of hope as a concept for nursing. Journal of Orthopaedic Nursing, 13(3), 119–127.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. Umphrey, L. R., & Sherblom, J. C. (2014). The relationship of hope to self-compassion, relational social skill, communication apprehension, and life satisfaction. International Journal of Wellbeing, 4(2), 1–18.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. Urry, H. L., & Gross, J. J. (2010). Emotion regulation in older age. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 19(6), 352–357.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pasqualina Perrig-Chiello
    • 1
    Email author
  • Stefanie Spahni
    • 1
  • Katja Margelisch
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Psychology, Developmental PsychologyUniversity of BernBernSwitzerland

Personalised recommendations