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Polymer Concrete for Bridge Preservation

  • Michael M. Sprinkel
Conference paper

Abstract

Polymer concrete has been used for bridge preservation for more than 50 years. Latex-modified concrete overlays, developed in the 1960s, are used to extend the service life of bridge decks by providing improved adhesion and reduced permeability. In the 1980s, polymer concrete overlays made with polyester styrene, epoxy, and methacrylate binders became accepted deck protection systems for bridges and parking structures. The rapid cure allowed DOTs to install the skid-resistant deck protection overlays with short lane closure times providing minimal delays to the traveling public. Polymer concrete overlays are placed on pavement surfaces prone to accidents that can be reduced by the application of a high friction polymer surface treatment. Gravity fill polymer crack fillers were developed as a low-cost crack-sealing alternative that can help extend the life of cracked concrete decks. Accelerated bridge reconstruction in which deteriorated decks are replaced at night or other short lane closure periods is possible using prefabricated deck elements that are attached or joined using polymer concrete or rapid hardening polymer-modified concrete. Both polymer and polymer-modified concrete have and continue to be cost-effective fundamental materials for extending the life of our infrastructure, and use continues to increase.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Virginia Transportation Research Council, Virginia Department of TransportationCharlottesvilleUSA

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