Advertisement

Resources and Lineage: Meredith’s “Modern Love”

  • Jane Hedley
Chapter

Abstract

George Meredith used a lyric sequence to track the breakdown of a marriage along three key dimensions, each of which became crucial to the marriage sequence going forward: the shapes that time assumes within a marriage; the construction of identity through complex interactions between thought and speech, soliloquy, and conversation; and the involvement of third parties whose presence “triangulates” the marital dialogue. “Modern Love” was precedent-setting on all three dimensions: by taking a longer view of each in turn, this chapter establishes the self-conscious modernity of Meredith’s sequence.

References

  1. Abrams, M.H. 2009. A glossary of literary terms. 9th ed. Co-ed. Geoffrey Galt Harpham. Boston: Wadsworth Cengage. (Orig. pub. 1957.)Google Scholar
  2. Anderson, Benedict. 1983. Imagined communities: Reflections on the origins and spread of nationalism. Rev. ed. London: Verso, 2006.Google Scholar
  3. Barolini, Teodolinda. 1989. The making of a lyric sequence: Time and narrative in Petrarch’s Rerum vulgarium fragmenta. Modern Language Notes 104 (1): 1–38.Google Scholar
  4. Bernstein, Carol. 1979. Precarious enchantment: A reading of Meredith’s poetry. Washington, DC: Catholic University of America Press.Google Scholar
  5. Carson, Anne. 1986. Eros the bittersweet. Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  6. Cavell, Stanley. 1988. Two cheers for romance. In Passionate attachments, ed. Willard Gaylin and Ethel Person, 85–100. New York: The Free Press.Google Scholar
  7. Comstock, Cathy. 1987. ‘Speak, and I see the side-lie of a truth’: The problematics of truth in Meredith’s ‘Modern Love’. Victorian Poetry 25 (2): 129–141.Google Scholar
  8. Culler, Jonathan. 1981. The pursuit of signs. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul.Google Scholar
  9. Curran, Stuart. 1986. Poetic form and British Romanticism. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  10. De Rougemont, Denis. 1963. Love declared: Essays on the myths of love. Trans. Richard Howard. New York: Pantheon.Google Scholar
  11. Dunn, Stephen. 2004. The insistence of beauty: Poems. New York: W. W. Norton.Google Scholar
  12. Durling, Robert. 1976. Introduction. In Petrarch’s lyric poems, 1–34. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  13. Frye, Northrop. 1957. Anatomy of criticism. Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  14. Galvin, James. 2003. X. Port Townsend, WA: Copper Canyon Press.Google Scholar
  15. Golden, Arline. 1973. ‘The game of sentiment’: Tradition and innovation in Meredith’s ‘Modern Love’. ELH 40 (2): 264–284.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. ———. 1974. Victorian renascence: The revival of the amatory sonnet sequence, 1850–1900. Genre 7: 133–147.Google Scholar
  17. Greene, Roland. 1991. Post-Petrarchism: Origins and innovations of the Western lyric sequence. Princeton: Princeton University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Hagstrum, Jean H. 1992. Esteem enlivened by desire: The couple from Homer to Shakespeare. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  19. Hale, Dorthy, ed. 2006. Psychoanalytic approaches: Introduction. In The novel: An anthology of criticism and theory 1900–2000, 272–293. Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
  20. Hecht, Anthony. 1967. The Dover bitch. In The hard hours, 17. New York: Atheneum.Google Scholar
  21. Holmes, John. 2010. Darwinism, feminism, and the sonnet sequence: Meredith’s ‘Modern Love’. Victorian Literature 48 (4): 523–538.Google Scholar
  22. Hughes, Linda. 2010. The Cambridge introduction to Victorian poetry. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Jagodzinski, Cecile M. 1999. Privacy and print: Reading and writing in seventeenth-century England. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia.Google Scholar
  24. Meredith, George. 1862/2012. Modern Love and poems of the English roadside, with poems and ballads. Ed. Rebecca N. Mitchell and Criscillia Ann Benford. New Haven: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
  25. Mermin, Dorothy. 1976. Poetry as fiction: Meredith’s ‘Modern Love’. ELH 43 (1): 100–119.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Milton, John. 1644. The doctrine and discipline of divorce. In The Milton reading room, ed. Thomas Luxon et al., 2nd ed. Accessed May 28, 2017. http://www.dartmouth.edu/~milton.Google Scholar
  27. ———. 1667, 1674. Paradise Lost. The Milton reading room. Ed. Thomas Luxon et al. Accessed May 28, 2017. http://www.dartmouth.edu/~milton.
  28. Pinch, Adela. 2008. Love thinking. Victorian Studies 50 (3): 379–397.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. ———. 2010. Thinking about other people in nineteenth-century British writing. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Puttenham, George. 1589. The maner of reioysings at mariages and weddings. In The arte of English poesie, Book I, Chap. XXVI. Project Gutenberg, 2005. http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/16420/pg16420-images.html.
  31. Reader, Willie D. 1972. The autobiographical author as fictional character: Point of view in Meredith’s ‘Modern Love’. Victorian Poetry 10 (2): 131–143.Google Scholar
  32. Richter, David H. 1990. Dialogism and poetry. Studies in the Literary Imagination 23 (1): 9–27.Google Scholar
  33. Selinger, Eric Murphy. 1998. What is it then between us? Traditions of love in American poetry. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar
  34. Sidney, Sir Philip. 1591. Astrophil and Stella. In The poems of Sir Philip Sidney, ed. William A. Ringler Jr., 163–237. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1962. http://www.luminarium.org/renascence-editions/stella.html.Google Scholar
  35. Spacks, Patricia Meyer. 2014. Privacy: Concealing the eighteenth-century self. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  36. Tanner, Tony. 1979. Adultery in the novel: Contract and transgression. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.Google Scholar
  37. Taylor, Charles. 2007. A secular age. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  38. Tucker, Cynthia Grant. 1972. Meredith’s broken laurel: ‘Modern Love’ and the Renaissance sonnet tradition. Victorian Poetry 10 (4): 351–365.Google Scholar
  39. Vendler, Helen. 2002. Poems, poets, poetry: An introduction and anthology. New York: Bedford/St. Martin’s. (3rd ed. 2009.).Google Scholar
  40. ———. 2013. Tragedy in the bedroom. New Republic 29: 39–45.Google Scholar
  41. Wordsworth, William. 1807 [1815]. Ode. [Intimations of immortality from recollections of early childhood.] In Poems in two volumes, vol. 2. Duke University Libraries: British Romantic Literature. https://archive.org/details/poemsintwovolume00word.
  42. Zak, Gur. 2010. Petrarch’s humanism and the care of the self. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jane Hedley
    • 1
  1. 1.Bryn Mawr CollegeBryn MawrUSA

Personalised recommendations