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Conclusions

  • Peter Jackson
  • Helene Brembeck
  • Jonathan Everts
  • Maria Fuentes
  • Bente Halkier
  • Frej Daniel Hertz
  • Angela Meah
  • Valerie Viehoff
  • Christine Wenzl
Chapter
  • 322 Downloads

Abstract

This chapter draws the argument together and offers suggestions for future research. It assesses the difference it makes to approach convenience food in terms of social practice theory and the insights that can be drawn from our comparative, international and interdisciplinary approach. The chapter highlights the analytical utility of the distinction we draw between ‘convenience’ and ‘convenient’ food and the value of our key concept of ‘conveniencization’. Conclusions are provided at the level of the project as a whole and for each of our four cases, including a series of inferences about the relevance of our work for policy and practice. The chapter summarizes the lessons learnt from our ‘reframing’ of convenience food through a social practice lens in terms of the health and environmental implications of current consumption practices and the potential for developing healthier and more sustainable alternatives.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter Jackson
    • 1
  • Helene Brembeck
    • 2
  • Jonathan Everts
    • 3
  • Maria Fuentes
    • 2
  • Bente Halkier
    • 4
  • Frej Daniel Hertz
    • 5
  • Angela Meah
    • 1
  • Valerie Viehoff
    • 6
  • Christine Wenzl
    • 7
  1. 1.Department of GeographyUniversity of SheffieldSheffieldUK
  2. 2.Centre for Consumer ScienceUniversity of GothenburgGothenburgSweden
  3. 3.Institute of Geosciences and GeographyMartin-Luther-UniversityHalle-WittenbergGermany
  4. 4.Department of SociologyCopenhagen UniversityCopenhagenDenmark
  5. 5.Department of Communication and ArtsRoskilde UniversityRoskildeDenmark
  6. 6.Institute of EducationUniversity College LondonLondonUK
  7. 7.Institute of GeographyUniversity of BonnBonnGermany

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