Assemblage Thinking

  • Hélène de Burgh-Woodman
Chapter

Abstract

In this theoretical chapter, the basic tenets of assemblage thinking, as conceived by Deleuze and Guattari are elaborated, suggesting that assemblage thinking offers significant new insights into how we can apprehend the convergent media environment, rethink some of our fundamental assumptions around the notions of genre and platform specificity and revisit the conceptualisation of advertising as spectacle. This chapter draws on some of the more important aspects of Deleuze and Guattari’s work to provide a framework for reading advertising through an assemblage lens

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hélène de Burgh-Woodman
    • 1
  1. 1.The University of Notre Dame AustraliaSydneyAustralia

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