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Introduction

  • Hélène de Burgh-Woodman
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter provides a general introduction to the text. It outlines the key arguments pursued through and flags the core theoretical frameworks of convergence culture, assemblage thinking and media. A brief history of the evolution of contemporary advertising is given.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hélène de Burgh-Woodman
    • 1
  1. 1.The University of Notre Dame AustraliaSydneyAustralia

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