Introduction to Building Energy Modeling

  • Larry Brackney
  • Andrew Parker
  • Daniel Macumber
  • Kyle Benne
Chapter

Abstract

There is good reason that so much attention is paid to the concept of mathematical model in engineering and physics curriculum. Simple regressions derived from empirical data, differential equations based on first-principles, or detailed computational fluid dynamic simulations each provide an analytical framework that yields insight into the behavior of physical systems. In turn, those insights can lead to design decisions that have real impact on safety, cost, and performance of the cars we drive, the power grids that deliver our electricity, and the energy efficiency of the buildings we live and work in.

References

  1. Crawley D, Lawrie L et al (1998) Beyond BLAST and DOE-2: EnergyPlus, a new-generation energy simulation program. ACEEE Summer StudyGoogle Scholar
  2. Hittle D (1977) The building loads analysis and system thermodynamics program, BLAST, U.S. Army Construction Engineering Research Laboratory, Champaign, ILGoogle Scholar
  3. Kusuda T (1976) NBSLD, the computer program for heating and cooling loads in buildings, NBS Building Science Series 69Google Scholar
  4. Lau H, Ayres J 1979 Building energy analysis programs. In: Proceedings of the 11th conference on winter simulation, vol 1, pp. 283–289, San Diego, CAGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Larry Brackney
    • 1
  • Andrew Parker
    • 1
  • Daniel Macumber
    • 1
  • Kyle Benne
    • 1
  1. 1.National Renewable Energy LaboratoryGoldenUSA

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