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Historical Amounts of Substances

  • Steven A. Treese
Chapter

Abstract

The base unit for measuring the amount of a substance, the mole, developed over the past couple of centuries as our understanding of chemistry and chemical reactions grew. The mole [or its larger embodiments: the kilomole (kmol) and pound mole (lbmol or lb-mol)] is used extensively in laboratory chemistry as well as industrial chemical and petroleum facility design and operation. The development of the concept of a mole from the earliest chemical work defining combining weights to modern understanding is explored. The SI definition of a mole and its implications are discussed. This SI base unit is being considered for revision, but remains with the current definition at the present time.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Gig HarborUSA

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