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Governance in Sports Organisations

  • Wolfgang Maennig
Chapter

Abstract

With the revelation of the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) corruption scandal in May 2015, the integrity and thus the general configuration of (international) sports organizations were publicly contested. The principle of moral behavior in international sports organizations (Arnold 1994) was clearly violated, and the high (self) esteem of sports suffered. The accusations of corruption regarding the Men’s FIFA World Cups (BBC 2015) as well as the bribing scandals during the Olympic bidding processes stained the integrity of sports. Sports values, also condensed in the concept of “Olympic spirit” (or “Olympism” (Adi 2014)), are based on the philosophy that best performances (should) lead to best results and rewards. This article deals with the concept of (good) governance in sports organizations, existing challenges and issues that have yet to be resolved. It lays out ideas for enhanced good governance through the example of mega-events.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of EconomicsUniversity of HamburgHamburgGermany

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