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Different Approaches to Solve the MRTA Problem

  • Anis Koubaa
  • Hachemi Bennaceur
  • Imen Chaari
  • Sahar Trigui
  • Adel Ammar
  • Mohamed-Foued Sriti
  • Maram Alajlan
  • Omar Cheikhrouhou
  • Yasir Javed
Chapter
Part of the Studies in Computational Intelligence book series (SCI, volume 772)

Abstract

The multi-robot task allocation problem is a fundamental problem in robotics research area. The problem roughly consists of finding an optimal allocation of tasks among several robots to reduce the mission cost to a minimum. As mentioned in Chap.  6, extensive research has been conducted in the area for answering the following question: Which robot should execute which task? In this chapter, we design different solutions to solve the MRTA problem. We propose four different approaches: an improved distributed market-based approach (IDMB), a clustering market-based approach (CM-MTSP), a fuzzy logic-based approach (FL-MTSP), and Move-and-Improve approach. These approaches must define how tasks are assigned to the robots. The IDBM, CM-MTSP, and Move-and-Improve approaches are based on the use of an auction process where bids are used to evaluate the assignment. The FL-MTSP is based on the use of the fuzzy logic algebra to combine objectives to be optimized.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anis Koubaa
    • 1
  • Hachemi Bennaceur
    • 2
  • Imen Chaari
    • 3
  • Sahar Trigui
    • 3
  • Adel Ammar
    • 2
  • Mohamed-Foued Sriti
    • 2
  • Maram Alajlan
    • 2
  • Omar Cheikhrouhou
    • 4
  • Yasir Javed
    • 5
  1. 1.Prince Sultan UniversityRiyadhSaudi Arabia
  2. 2.College of Computer and Information SciencesAl Imam Mohammad Ibn Saud Islamic UniversityRiyadhSaudi Arabia
  3. 3.University Campus of ManoubaManoubaTunisia
  4. 4.College of Computers and Information TechnologyTaif UniversityTaifSaudi Arabia
  5. 5.College of Computer and Information SciencesPrince Sultan UniversityRiyadhSaudi Arabia

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