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Managing Erasmus

  • David Cairns
  • Ewa Krzaklewska
  • Valentina Cuzzocrea
  • Airi-Alina Allaste
Chapter

Abstract

In this chapter, we explore the management of Erasmus mobility among undergraduates, focusing on the example of Portuguese universities. Through the use of interview material gathered at eight different institutions, we are able to explain the process through which exchange visits are organized from an organisation’s perspective. This includes managing incoming and outgoing mobility, and the challenges of coping with internal and external pressures related to budgetary constraints and the need to maintain levels of circulation. We are also able to assess the potential of Erasmus to contribute to the social remit of the programme, including the inclusion of students who face economic or other circumstantial barriers to participation.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Cairns
    • 1
  • Ewa Krzaklewska
    • 2
  • Valentina Cuzzocrea
    • 3
  • Airi-Alina Allaste
    • 4
  1. 1.ISCTE-University Institute of LisbonLisbonPortugal
  2. 2.Jagiellonian UniversityKrakowPoland
  3. 3.University of CagliariCagliariItaly
  4. 4.Tallinn UniversityTallinnEstonia

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