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African American Families: Historical and Contemporary Forces Shaping Family Life and Studies

  • Amanda Moras
  • Constance Shehan
  • Felix M. Berardo
Chapter
Part of the Handbooks of Sociology and Social Research book series (HSSR)

Abstract

This work provides a broad analysis of sociological and historical literature on African American families. Beginning with an analysis of Black families under slavery, we trace the current diversity of African American family structures through history, elaborating on the structural oppressions that shape these experiences. The contemporary experiences of Black families are intimately connected with the historical, economic, and social conditions encountered by generations past. This work is not intended to be a definitive statement regarding the experiences of largely diverse groups of families, but instead a critical look at the structural forces that affect the lives of Black families and the systematic racism that informs public discourse about Black families and scholarship.

Keywords

Family Gender African American families Motherhood Family labor 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Amanda Moras
    • 1
  • Constance Shehan
    • 2
  • Felix M. Berardo
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of SociologySacred Heart UniversityFairfieldUSA
  2. 2.Department of Sociology and Criminology & LawUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA
  3. 3.Emeritus Professor of SociologyUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA

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