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Caring as Work: Research and Theory

  • Amy ArmeniaEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Handbooks of Sociology and Social Research book series (HSSR)

Abstract

For all the attention paid to wage labor and the market, it is only in recent decades that scholars have begun to focus on care, the work that we do to nurture and support each other in our society. The study of care is a distinctively feminist endeavor, as it highlights a body of labor that is critically important to society, commonly devalued as “women’s work,” and considered a central mechanism in the reproduction of gender inequalities in our society. In this chapter, I review the background of carework theory and research, including the definition of care, social and economic impact of care, exploration of paid and unpaid care work, and global dimensions of care. I conclude with some attention to the limitations of current research, and directions for future work.

Keywords

Carework Family Emotional labor 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Rollins CollegeWinter ParkUSA

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