Study Context

Chapter
Part of the The Anthropocene: Politik—Economics—Society—Science book series (APESS, volume 22)

Abstract

The roots of the northern Uganda conflict between the government of Uganda (GoU) and the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) was entwined with the history of conflicts in Uganda and the rise to power of the National Resistance Movement/Army (NRM/A). The conflict persisted because of fragmented and divisive national politics, strategies and tactics adopted by the armed protagonists, and regional and international interests. The harrowing war has claimed many innocent civilian lives, forcefully displaced over 1.8 million people, and destroyed schools and health centres. The effect of the war has been characterised by widespread and systematic violations of human rights, including rape, abduction of men, women and children, torture, increased economic decay, and national and regional insecurity. The war came to an end in 2006, when peace talks between the government and the LRA resulted in a ceasefire. However, LRA’s leader, Joseph Kony, was not inclined to sign the Final Peace Agreement. Hence, a permanent ceasefire and disarmament, demobiliation and reintegration (DDR) did not occur. Subsequently, the LRA was forced out of Uganda by the Ugandan People’s Defence Force (UPDF), and has since been isolated.

Keywords

Northern Uganda Government of Uganda National Resistance Army Lord’s Resistance Army Displacement Colonialisation Holy Spirit Movement 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Constituent College of AgricultureGulu UniversityMoroto, KaramojaUganda

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