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Miscellaneous Vector-Borne Diseases

  • Jerome Goddard
Chapter
Part of the Infectious Disease book series (ID)

Abstract

Kissing bugs, tsetse flies, black flies, chigger mites, and human body lice are significant arthropod vectors of disease worldwide. Miscellaneous vector-borne diseases discussed in this chapter include Chagas’ disease, African sleeping sickness, onchocerciasis, scrub typhus, epidemic typhus, trench fever, and louse-borne relapsing fever. The biology, ecology, and disease relationships of each of the abovementioned vectors are discussed, including where each breeds, what animal hosts they feed on, and the like. Lastly, each of these miscellaneous diseases is presented and discussed, including their geographic distributions, vectors, and comments about their treatment, prevention, and control.

Keywords

Kissing bugs Triatoma Chagas’ disease Tsetse flies African sleeping sickness Human African trypanosomiasis Black flies Onchocerciasis Chigger mites Scrub typhus Human lice Epidemic typhus Trench fever Louse-borne relapsing fever 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jerome Goddard
    • 1
  1. 1.Extension Professor of Medical EntomologyMississippi State UniversityMississippi StateUSA

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