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Mathematics Lesson Study Around the World: Conclusions and Looking Ahead

  • Stéphane Clivaz
  • Akihiko Takahashi
Chapter
Part of the ICME-13 Monographs book series (ICME13Mo)

Abstract

Educators around the globe seek to emulate the success of Japanese lesson study. However, implementation of lesson study outside Japan has been met with varying rates of success and challenges. To address the challenges, lesson study researchers and educators, have gathered their reflections in this book. This concluding chapter discusses strategies for developing a theorization that can be understood outside of Japan and its specific cultural norms, adaptations of lesson study outside Japan , the contributions of lesson study for educational reform, the sustainability of lesson study and the challenges involved in establishing lesson study on a larger scale. As the summary of this book, this chapter proposes our concluding statement and suggests future goals for implementation and research.

Keywords

Lesson study International Theoretization Mathematics education 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.UER MS and 3LSLausanne University of Teacher EducationLausanneSwitzerland
  2. 2.College of EducationDePaul UniversityChicagoUSA

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