An Introduction to Tocqueville’s First Work

  • Emily Katherine Ferkaluk
Chapter
Part of the Recovering Political Philosophy book series (REPOPH)

Abstract

Ferkaluk reviews the historical context for Tocqueville’s and Beaumont’s study of American prisons, outlines the structure of On the Penitentiary System, addresses contemporary scholarship on the work, spells out some assumptions in her argument, and gives a brief overview of the subsequent chapters. Ferkaluk also provides a theoretical framework of Tocqueville’s moderate liberalism, which is used to interpret the main themes of the text. She argues that Tocqueville and Beaumont responded to two important penal questions in their first work. First, the authors addressed what type of penal discipline best represents a moderate view of individual reformation. Second, the authors answered a political question of what type of penal institution would best remedy the problem of growing recidivism in France.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Emily Katherine Ferkaluk
    • 1
  1. 1.Cedarville UniversityCedarvilleUSA

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