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Nutritional Considerations for Concurrent Training

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Concurrent Aerobic and Strength Training

Abstract

Employing nutritional ergogenic aids is an established practice for supporting exercise training-induced performance gains in almost every athletic sphere. Concurrent training (i.e. combining resistance with endurance exercise) poses unique physiological challenges that likely require specific tailoring of nutritional strategies. In particular, nutrition for the concurrent athlete aims to: (1) support muscle growth for maximising hypertrophic response that occurs when resistance training is performed in conjunction with endurance exercise whilst (2) promoting aerobic adaptation in the face of strength training. This chapter discusses the potential role of macronutrients, and a list of emerging ‘nutraceuticals’, to provide the backdrop for maximising physiological adaptations to concurrent training.

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Etheridge, T., Atherton, P.J. (2019). Nutritional Considerations for Concurrent Training. In: Schumann, M., Rønnestad, B. (eds) Concurrent Aerobic and Strength Training. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-75547-2_16

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