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Preoperative Imaging Evaluation of Living Liver Transplant Donors

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Transplantation Imaging

Abstract

Living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) requires a thorough preoperative imaging assessment of both the donor and recipient, used for candidate selection and surgical planning. This is accomplished with a combination of contrast-enhanced CT and MRI; these modalities provide complimentary information and together provide a complete evaluation of the vascular, biliary, and liver parenchymal anatomy. Given the healthy living donor population, radiation-reducing CT protocols are paramount. Advanced imaging techniques for quantification of parenchymal fat and iron and use of 3D and volumetric reformations are also routinely employed to enhance candidate selection and surgical planning. In addition to state-of-the-art imaging protocols, radiologists must also understand the indications and contraindications for living donor liver transplantation, know how to interpret posttreatment imaging for the purposes of bridging or downstaging in the setting of hepatocellular carcinoma, and understand the basics of the different transplant operations. Armed with this knowledge, radiologists can produce thorough, relevant reports to help hepatobiliary surgeons plan both the donor and recipient transplant operations.

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Correspondence to Kristine S. Burk M.D. .

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Burk, K.S., Sahani, D. (2018). Preoperative Imaging Evaluation of Living Liver Transplant Donors. In: Fananapazir, G., Lamba, R. (eds) Transplantation Imaging. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-75266-2_1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-75266-2_1

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  • Online ISBN: 978-3-319-75266-2

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