Seismic Intensity Estimation Using Macroseismic Questionnaires and Instrumental Data—Case Study Barlad, Vaslui County

  • Iren-Adelina Moldovan
  • Bogdan Grecu
  • Angela Petruta Constantin
  • Andreita Anghel
  • Elena Manea
  • Liviu Manea
  • Victorin Emilian Toader
  • Raluca Partheniu
Conference paper
Part of the Springer Natural Hazards book series (SPRINGERNAT)

Abstract

In the last decade, many efforts were done to predict the macroseismic intensity in case of felt Vrancea earthquakes and additionally an online environment was developed for the automatic approximation of the intensity from peoples’ feedback. Besides the extended scientific studies, the near real-time estimation of the macroseismic intensity recently became mandatory for the insurance companies to cover some of the losses and damages that earthquakes might cause to houses, belongings, and other structures. Due to the insurance companies’ requests, the macroseismic questionnaires method was doubled by the seismic intensity determination using instrumental data, as recommended in the Romanian Seismic Intensity Scale Standard (STAS 3684-71). In the present study, the procedure is shown, for the last earthquakes with ML larger than 5.0, occurred in Vrancea zone, and felt on the extra-Carpathian area. We have selected the case study in Barlad, Vaslui county, because there have been recorded the largest accelerations (122 cm/s2) and have been reported the largest MSK intensities (VI) from Romania during the Mw 5.5 September 24, 2016 earthquake. The results obtained using the two approaches (macroseismic and instrumental data) have been compared and some differences have been found.

Keywords

Intensity data points (IDPs) Vrancea earthquakes Peak ground acceleration (PGA) 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This paper was partially carried out within Nucleu Program, supported by ANCSI, projects no. PN 16 35 01 06, PN 16 35 03 01, PN 16 35 01 01 and the Partnership in Priority Areas Program—PNII, under MEN-UEFISCDI, DARING Project no. 69/2014 and a grant of the Romanian National Authority for Scientific Research and Innovation (ANCSI)—UEFISCDI, project number PN-II-RU-TE-2014-4-0701.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Iren-Adelina Moldovan
    • 1
  • Bogdan Grecu
    • 1
  • Angela Petruta Constantin
    • 1
  • Andreita Anghel
    • 1
  • Elena Manea
    • 1
  • Liviu Manea
    • 1
  • Victorin Emilian Toader
    • 1
  • Raluca Partheniu
    • 1
  1. 1.National Institute of Research and Development for Earth PhysicsMagureleRomania

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