Setting Acceptable Risk Levels for Astronauts

  • Erik Seedhouse
Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Space Development book series (BRIEFSSPACE)

Abstract

The permissible exposure levels (PELs) for radiation exposure that NASA sets for its astronauts are meant to prevent inflight risks and to limit risk to a level that is acceptable from an ethical, moral, and financial standpoint. In the 1960s and 1970s, PELs were set based on recommendations made by the National Academy of Sciences. In the 1980s, more data on radiation exposure had been accumulated, and NASA asked the National Council on Radiation Protection (NCRP) to re-assess the dose limits for astronauts working in LEO. This re-assessment culminated in the NCRP Report No. 98, published in 1989, which recommended age and gender career dose limits that applied a 3% increase in cancer mortality as a risk limit.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Erik Seedhouse
    • 1
  1. 1.Applied Aviation SciencesEmbry-Riddle Aeronautical UniversityDaytona BeachUSA

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