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Discussion: Minority Language Rights in Northern Catalonia

  • James Hawkey
Chapter

Abstract

Hawkey utilises the experimental findings of the project to benefit the community, through the proposal of language policy recommendations. In order to pinpoint the needs of Catalan speakers in Northern Catalonia, Hawkey compares the situation in the region against a number of language rights benchmarks, as advanced in the Girona Manifesto. Unsurprisingly, support for Catalan in France is shown to fall short of ambitious language rights suggestions. Comparatively modest revitalisation efforts are suggested, involving the increased presence of Catalan in the media and education sectors. He concludes that the most suitable vehicular language for such efforts is supralocal (and not local) Catalan. This decision is supported by the abundance of extant resources in supralocal Catalan, as well as the existing presence of supralocal varieties in the region, and the typological similarity between supralocal and local varieties.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • James Hawkey
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Modern LanguagesUniversity of BristolBristolUK

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