Buildings that Perform: Thermal Performance and Comfort

  • Christopher Gorse
  • Martin Fletcher
  • Felix Thomas
  • Fiona Fylan
  • David Glew
  • David Farmer
  • Pat Aloise-Young
Chapter

Abstract

Building performance evaluation considers the whole building system from a fabric, service and occupant perspective, as well as its response to the environment and potential integration into smart cities. There are many BPE methods used to collect building data and inform designs. Energy and environment monitoring, simulation, building surveys, post occupancy evaluation, element and whole building testing and their link to future development are discussed.

The environmentally conscious are stretching the boundaries of building performance as sustainability, resilience and thermal comfort credentials gain a greater degree of importance, especially, when considered against the potential value of a property. The whole building systems are now required to be smart and integrated, with the advanced building enclosures prioritising environments that are secure and energy efficient; the enclosure should protect the health and wellbeing of occupants and respond to the needs of the user. To accomplish such standards, the fabric properties of the building are key. The Passivhaus and EnerPHit build systems have adopted a fabric first approach, in achieving these objectives, whilst the nearly zero-energy buildings (nZEB) and energy plus buildings ensure that renewable energy and building services are given equal consideration. The microrenewable energy systems service the building and also store and supply clean energy back to the grid. For the developer and designers moving towards more advanced forms of building system, consideration must be given to a holistic understanding of how the building responds to the environment and user. BPE data and feedback from occupants, evaluated and through systematic research, is now used to incrementally developing buildings to meet future needs.

Keywords

Building performance and evaluation Building systems Fabric first Post occupancy evaluation Renewable energy Smart buildings Thermal comfort 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christopher Gorse
    • 1
  • Martin Fletcher
    • 1
  • Felix Thomas
    • 1
  • Fiona Fylan
    • 1
  • David Glew
    • 1
  • David Farmer
    • 1
  • Pat Aloise-Young
    • 1
  1. 1.Leeds Sustainability InstituteLeeds Beckett UniversityLeedsUK

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