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Astronautics pp 555–660Cite as

Orbit Perturbations

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Abstract

So far, we have studied the two-body problem, in which one body moves under a central Newtonian force, as given by a gravitational field of a second body, a point mass.

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  • DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-74373-8_12
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Fig. 12.1

Credit Montenbruck (2000)

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Credit GFZ Potsdam

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Credit GFZ Potsdam

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Credit GFZ Potsdam

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Credit Micheau (1995)

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Credit Micheau (1995)

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Credit NASA/Ronald J. Boain

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Credit Beutler (2005b) and Urs Hugentobler (1998)

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Credit L. Anselmo and C. Pardini, ISTI/CNR

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Credit GFZ Potsdam

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Credit GFZ Potsdam

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Credit Campan (1995), © CNES/CÉPADUÈS

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Credit Campan (1995), © CNES/CÉPADUÈS

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Credit Soop (1994), © ESA

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Credit Berlin (1988)

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Credit Soop (1994), © ESA

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Credit Berlin (1988)

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Credit A. Rossi, IFAC-CNR, 2010

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Credit Vallado (2007)

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Credit NASA

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Change history

  • 31 October 2019

    In the original version of the book, the following belated corrections are to be incorporated.

Notes

  1. 1.

    The term draconitic (a.k.a. draconic) derives from the ascending node of the Moon’s orbit around Earth, which in traditional astrology is called dragon’s head. The dragon is draco in Latin.

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Correspondence to Ulrich Walter .

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Walter, U. (2018). Orbit Perturbations. In: Astronautics. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-74373-8_12

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-74373-8_12

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