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Indigenous Siberian Food Sharing Networks: Social Innovation in a Transforming Economy

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Abstract

The sustainability of indigenous communities in the Arctic, and the vulnerable households within, is in large part dependent on their continuing food security. A social food-sharing network within the Ust’-Avam community on the Taimyr Peninsula in northern Siberia is analyzed for underlying patterns of resilience and key evolutionarily stable strategies supporting cooperative behavior. Factors influencing the network include interhousehold relatedness, reciprocal sharing, and interaction effects. Social association also influences sharing. Evidence for multiple determinants of food sharing in this sample is discussed in reference to major evolutionary hypotheses and comparable studies. In sum, the findings illustrate the robustness of self-organizing distribution networks in an economic context of uncertainty.

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Acknowledgments

JPZ is grateful to friends in Taimyr who participated in the research and hosted repeated visits. JPZ wrote the article. KSF conducted data manipulation and commented on earlier drafts. JPZ’s field research was supported by grants from the National Science Foundation OPP 0631970, the L.B.S. Leakey Foundation, and the Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology, Halle (Saale), Germany. We thank Amanda M. Fulk for comments on previous drafts of the paper.

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Correspondence to John P. Ziker .

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Ziker, J.P., Fulk, K.S. (2018). Indigenous Siberian Food Sharing Networks: Social Innovation in a Transforming Economy. In: Grippa, F., Leitão, J., Gluesing, J., Riopelle, K., Gloor, P. (eds) Collaborative Innovation Networks. Studies on Entrepreneurship, Structural Change and Industrial Dynamics. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-74295-3_10

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