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Practising Human Rights

  • José Julián López
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter argues that practice theory draws our attention to the fact that ideas, even normatively potent ones, derive their social power from the manner in which they are embedded in social relations, embodied and embrained by social actors, and inthinged in social technologies and artefacts. As a consequence, practice theory provides a fruitful approach to sociologically thickening conceptions of human rights. Reviewing a number of sociological contributions, López discusses the explanatory potential and pitfalls associated with mobilizing practice theory to do so. Drawing on the work of Fuyuki Kurasawa and Kate Nash, he argues that human rights can be understood as a political imaginary where ethico-political practice is geared towards making receivable the normative claims of distant and/or excluded others in an imagined ethical and political community.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • José Julián López
    • 1
  1. 1.University of OttawaOttawaCanada

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