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Assessment, Case Formulation and Intervention Models

Chapter

Abstract

Assessment is considered important in RE-CBC not only in the initial phase of coaching but also during the coaching process and at its termination, depending on its function. A comprehensive assessment provides an empirical basis for the case conceptualization and subsequent intervention using specific frameworks. During the coaching process, assessment offers understanding on the progress and potential “stuck points.” Formulation in RE-CBC is considered an essential part of making explicit components relating to the coachee’s view of the self, others and world and their influence on goals and current reactions/performance based on an empirically tested frameworks (e.g., the ABC generic model; Ellis, 1994). The most important criteria for the use the conextual ABC model in the RE-CBC assessment and formulation are related to its evidence-based status (David & Cobeanu, 2016), comprehensiveness (it can explain in a comprehensive manner the change mechanisms relating to coachee’s issues/goals), practical utility, and ease of implementation. As researchers, practitioners, and coaches, it is critical to inform our case formulation and intervention planning through the use of valid and adequate assessment tools.

Keywords

Assessment Coaching Rational-emotive Cognitive-behavioral Multi-cultural 

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Suggested Reading

  1. David, O. A. (2013). The online Prescriptive Index platform for the assessment of managerial competencies and coaching needs: Development and initial validation of the experience sampling Mood Wheel and the Manager-Rational and Irrational Beliefs Scale. Romanian Journal of Applied Psychology, 15(2), 41–50.Google Scholar
  2. David, O. A., & Matu, S. A. (2013). How to tell if managers are good coaches and how to help them improve during adversity? The managerial coaching assessment system and the rational managerial coaching program. Journal of Cognitive and Behavioral Psychotherapies, 13(2a), 259–274.Google Scholar
  3. David, O. A., Matu, A., Pintea, S., Cotet, C., & Nagy, D. (2014). Cognitive-behavioral processes based on using the ABC analysis by trainees’ for their personal development. Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy, 32(3), 198–215.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s10942-014-0189-0 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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  5. Ellis, A. (1991). The revised ABC’s of rational-emotive therapy (RET). Journal of Rational-Emotive &Cognitive-Behavior Therapy, 9(3), 139–172.  https://doi.org/10.1007/BF01061227 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Gavita, O. A., Freeman, A., & Sava, F. A. (2012). The development and validation of the Freeman-Gavita Prescriptive Executive Coaching (PEC) Multi-Rater Assessment. Journal of Cognitive and Behavioral Psychotherapies, 12(2), 159–174.Google Scholar
  7. Palmer, S. (2008). The PRACTICE model of coaching: Towards a solution-focused approach. Coaching Psychology International, 1(1), 4–6.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.International Coaching Institute, Department of Clinical Psychology and PsychotherapyBabes-Bolyai UniversityCluj-NapocaRomania
  2. 2.Department of Clinical PsychologyMidwestern University, GlendaleGlendaleUSA

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