Advertisement

The Coach-Coachee Relationship

  • Kristina Gyllensten
Chapter

Abstract

Why should we consider the coaching relationship? Regardless of which psychological theories, techniques, and frameworks that are used within coaching, the coaching process rely on interpersonal interaction in one form or another. Indeed, “the essence of coaching is putting people first” (Palmer & McDowall, 2010, p. 1).

References

  1. Alvey, S., & Barclay, K. (2007). The characteristics of dyadic trust in executive coaching. Journal of Leadership Studies, 1(1), 18–27.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Beck, A., Rush, A. J., Shaw, B. F., & Emery, G. (1979). Cognitive therapy of depression. New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  3. Bennett-Levy, J., Thwaites, R., Haarhoff, B. and Perry, H. (2015). Expereincing CBT from the inside out: A selfpractice/self-reflection workbook for therapists. London: Guilford Publications.Google Scholar
  4. Boyce, L. A., Jackson, R. J., & Neal, L. J. (2010). Building successful leadership coaching relationships. Journal of Management Development, 29(10), 914–931.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Bozer, G., Joo, B., & Santora, J. C. (2015). Executive coaching: Does coach-coachee matching based on similarity really matter? Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research, 67(3), 218–233.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Cox, E., & Bachkirova, T. (2007). Coaching with emotion: How coaches deal with difficult emotional situations. International Coaching Psychology Review, 2, 178–189.Google Scholar
  7. Cremona, K. (2010). Coaching and emotions: An exploration of how coaches engage and think about emotion. Coaching: An international Journal of Theory Research and Practice, 3, 46–59.Google Scholar
  8. Day, A., De Haan, E., Sills, C., Bertie, C., & Blass, E. (2008). Coaches’ experiences of critical moments in the coaching. International Coaching Psychology Review, 3(3), 207–218.Google Scholar
  9. De Haan, E., Bertie, C., Day, A., & Sills, C. (2010). Critical moments of clients and coaches: A direct-comparison study. International Coaching Psychology Review, 5(2), 109–128.Google Scholar
  10. De Haan, E., Culpin, V., & Curd, J. (2011). Executive coaching in practice: what determines helpfulness for clients of coaching? Personnel Review, 40(1), 24–44.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. De Haan, E., Duckworth, A., Birch, D., & Jones, C. (2013). Executive coaching outcome research: The contribution of common factors such as relationship, personality match and self-efficacy. Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research, 65(1), 40–57.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. De Haan, E., Grant, A. M., Burger, Y., & Eriksson, P. O. (2016). A large-scale study of executive and workplace coaching: The relative contributions of relationship, personality match and self-efficacy. Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research, 68(3), 189–207.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Dobosz, M., & Tee, D. (2016). Generation Y: Are British organisations ready for younger executive coaches? A mixed methods study. In O. M. Spaten & A. O’Broin (Eds.), The coaching relationship- and beyond. Aalborg: Aalborg University Library.Google Scholar
  14. Garfield, S.L. (1995). The client therapist relationship in rational emotive therapy. Journal of Rational Emotive and Cognitive Behavior Therapy, 13(2), 101–116.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Gilbert, P., & Leahy, R. L. (Eds.). (2007). The therapeutic relationship in the cognitive behavioural psychotherapies. Hove: Routledge.Google Scholar
  16. Grant, A. M. (2006). A personal perspective on professional coaching and the development of coaching psychology. International Coaching Psychology Review, 1, 12–20.Google Scholar
  17. Grant, A. M. (2014). Autonomy support, relationship satisfaction and goal focus in the coach–coachee relationship: Which best predicts coaching success? Coaching: An International Journal of Theory, Research and Practice, 7(1), 18–38.Google Scholar
  18. Gyllensten, K., & Palmer, S. (2007). The coaching relationship: An interpretive phenomenological analysis. International Coaching Psychology Review, 2(2), 168–177.Google Scholar
  19. Gyllensten, K., Palmer, S., Nilsson, E., Regner, A. M., & Frodi, A. (2010). Experiences of cognitive coaching: A qualitative study. International Coaching Psychology Review, 5(2), 98–107.Google Scholar
  20. Hardy, G., Cahill, J., & Barkham, M. (2007). Active ingredients of the therapeutic relationship that promote client change: A research perspective. In P. Gilbert & R. L. Leahy (Eds.), The therapeutic relationship in the cognitive behavioural psychotherapies. Hove: Routledge.Google Scholar
  21. Hart, V., Blattner, J., & Leipsic, S. (2001). Coaching versus therapy: A perspective. Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research, 53(4), 229–237.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Jones, G., & Spooner, K. (2006). Coaching high achievers. Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research, 58, 40–50.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Kauffman, C., & Bachkirova, T. (2008). Coaching is the ultimate customisable solution: An interview with David Peterson. Coaching: An International Journal of Theory, Research and Practice, 1(2), 114–119.Google Scholar
  24. Kemp, T. (2008). Self-management and the coaching relationship: Exploring coaching impact beyond models and methods. International Coaching Psychology Review, 3(1), 32–42.Google Scholar
  25. Levinson, H. (1996). Executive coaching. Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research, 48, 115–123.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. McGovern, J., Lindemann, M., Vergara, M., Murphy, S., Barker, L., & Warrenfeltz, R. (2001). Maximizing the impact of executive coaching: Behavioral change, organizational outcomes, and return on investment. Manchester Review, 6(1), 1–9.Google Scholar
  27. McKenna, D. D., & Davis, S. L. (2009). Hidden in plain sight: The active ingredients of executive coaching. Industrial and Organizational Psychology: Perspectives on Science and Practice, 2(3), 244–260.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Najafi, T. & Lee-Baranovich, D. (2014). Theoretical background, therapeutic process, therapeutic relationship, and therapeutic techniques of REBT and CBT; and some parallels and dissimilarities between the two approaches. International Journal of Education and Research, 2, 1–12.Google Scholar
  29. Neenan, M. (2008). From cognitive behaviour therapy to cognitive behaviour coaching (CBC). Journal of Rational-Emotive-Cognitive- Behaviour Therapy, 26, 3–15.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. O’Broin, A. (2013). Whither the coaching relationship? A mixed methods study exploring key aspects, and examining boundaries in its formation (Unpublished PhD thesis, City University London).Google Scholar
  31. O’Broin, A. (2016). Where we have been, where are we now, and where we might be heading: Where next for the coaching relationship? The Danish Journal of Coaching Psychology, 5, 57–73.Google Scholar
  32. O’Broin, A., & Palmer, S. (2007). Re-apprising the coach-client relationship: The unassuming change agent in coaching. In S. Palmer & A. Whybrow (Eds.), Handbook of coaching psychology: A guide for practitioners. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  33. O’Broin, A., & Palmer, S. (2009a). Co-creating an optimal coaching alliance: A cognitive behavioural coaching perspective. International Coaching Psychology Review, 4, 184–193.Google Scholar
  34. O’Broin, A., & Palmer, S. (2009b). Enhancing the coaching alliance and relationship. In S. Palmer & M. Neenan (Eds.), Cognitive behavioural coaching in action. Hove: Routledge.Google Scholar
  35. O’Broin, A. & Palmer, S. (2010a). The coaching alliance as a universal concept spanning conceptual approaches. Coaching Psychology International, 3(1) 3–6.Google Scholar
  36. O’Broin, A., & Palmer, S. (2010b). Exploring key aspects in the formation of coaching relationships: Initial indicators from the perspective of the coachee and the coach. Coaching: An International Journal of Theory, Research and Practice, 3(2), 124–143.Google Scholar
  37. Palmer, S., & McDowall, A. (2010). The coaching relationship: Putting people first. In S. Palmer & A. McDowall (Eds.), The coaching relationship: Putting people first. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  38. Passmore, J. (2010). A grounded theory study of the coachee experience: The implications for training and practice in coaching psychology. International Coaching Psychology Review, 5(1), 48–62.Google Scholar
  39. Passmore, J., & Law, H. (2009). Cross cultural and diversity coaching (pp. 4–15). London, UK: Kogan Page.Google Scholar
  40. Smither, J. (2011). Can psychotherapy research serve as a guide for research about executive coaching? An agenda for the next decade. Journal of Business Psychology, 26, 135–145.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. Spinelli, E. (2008). Coaching and therapy: Similarities and divergences. International Coaching Psychology Review, 3(3), 241–249.Google Scholar
  42. Szymanska, K. (2009). The case for assessment and case conceptualisation in coaching. Coaching Psychology International, 2(1), 6–9.Google Scholar
  43. Thwaites, R., & Bennett-Levy, J. (2007). Conceptualising empathy in cognitive behaviour therapy: Making the implicit explicit. Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy, 35(5), 591–612.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. Wasylyshyn, K. M. (2003). Executive coaching: An outcome study. Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research, 55(2), 94–106.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. Wycherley, I. M., & Cox, E. (2008). Factors in the selection and matching of executive coaches in organisations. Coaching: An International Journal of Theory, Research and Practice, 1, 39–53.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kristina Gyllensten
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Occupational and Environmental MedicineUniversity of Gotenburg and Sahlgrenska University HospitalGothenburgSweden

Personalised recommendations