Advertisement

Introduction

  • Claire Scammell
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Translating and Interpreting book series (PTTI)

Abstract

This introductory chapter begins by briefly describing the case study news event – what Sarkozy said in the ‘suburbs’ in 2005, and how the former French president’s comments were reported in the British press. The discussion highlights the impact of the translation process on the accuracy of quotations and on readers’ interpretations of foreign news events. The introduction specifies the book’s concern with the norm for domesticating news translation strategies and the case it makes for introducing a degree of foreignisation. It sets out a focus on the translation practices of the global news agencies and gives an overview of the investigation made into the potential for a foreignised approach, as a viable, ethical alternative to current practice for the Reuters news agency.

Keywords

News translation Domestication Foreignisation Global news agencies Sarkozy Translation strategy 

References

  1. Bassnett, Susan. 2005. “Bringing the News Back Home: Strategies of Acculturation and Foreignisation.” Language and Intercultural Communication 5(2): 120–130. doi:  https://doi.org/10.1080/14708470508668888.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Bielsa, Esperança. 2010. “Cosmopolitanism, Translation and the Experience of the Foreign.” Across Languages and Cultures 11(2): 161–174. doi:  https://doi.org/10.1556/Acr.11.2010.2.2.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Bielsa, Esperança. 2014. “Cosmopolitanism as Translation.” Cultural Sociology 8(4): 392–406. doi:  https://doi.org/10.1177/1749975514546235.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Bielsa, Esperança. 2016. “News Translation: Global or Cosmopolitan Connections?” Media, Culture and Society 38(2): 196–211. doi:  https://doi.org/10.1177/0163443715613635.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Bielsa, Esperança, and Susan Bassnett. 2009. Translation in Global News. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  6. Cotter, Colleen. 2010. News Talk: Investigating the Language of Journalism. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Holland, Robert. 2013. “News Translation.” In Routledge Handbook of Translation Studies, edited by Millan, Carmen, and Francesca Bartrina, 332–346. Abingdon: Routledge.Google Scholar
  8. Pedersen, Jan. 2005. “How Is Culture Rendered in Subtitles?” In Proceedings from MuTra 2005: Challenges of Multidimensional Translation, 1–18. Saarbrücken.Google Scholar
  9. Reuters. 2014. A Handbook of Reuters Journalism. Accessed October 2, 2014. http://handbook.reuters.com/index.php?title=Main_Page.
  10. Schäffner, Christina. 2005. “Bringing a German Voice to English-Speaking Readers: Spiegel International.” Language and Intercultural Communication 5(2): 154–167. doi:  https://doi.org/10.1080/14708470508668891.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Venuti, Lawrence. 1998. The Scandals of Translation: Towards an Ethics of Difference. London: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Venuti, Lawrence. 2008. The Translator’s Invisibility: A History of Translation. Second ed. London: Routledge.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Claire Scammell
    • 1
  1. 1.Freelance translator and editorStevenageUK

Personalised recommendations