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Self, Identity, and Individuality

  • Sarwar Alam
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter introduces readers to women’s and also men’s, perceptions of self, subjectivity, and individuality. This chapter also describes various religious and nonreligious groups of the village, and how members of each group engage religion in forming their subjectivity. It appears that there is no uniformity in the descriptions of the informants. However, by engaging Michel Foucault, and Clifford Geertz, this chapter compares the Western perceptions of the self with the perceptions of the people of Chandhara. By analyzing the narratives of the informants this chapter challenges the observation of some scholars that South Asians do not possess the idea of the self. Mostly based on the narratives of women and also men, this chapter describes women’s subjectivity of Chandhara that in some cases go against popular perception of the West regarding the status of Muslim women.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sarwar Alam
    • 1
  1. 1.King Fahd Center for Middle East StudiesUniversity of ArkansasFayettevilleUSA

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