Advertisement

Islamic Pedagogy: Potential and Perspective

  • Nadeem A. MemonEmail author
  • Mariam Alhashmi
Chapter

Abstract

Religious traditions embody inherent pedagogical perspectives—a way of teaching religion. Among Muslim scholarship, conceptual aspects of a philosophy of education rooted in Islam have been articulated but often piecemeal, making it inaccessible to Islamic schools today. The challenge has been in synthesising philosophies of Islamic education, or better termed Islamic pedagogy, in a way that is relevant and applicable to contemporary schools. This chapter aims to establish some semblance of an Islamic pedagogical framework. The concepts and perspectives identified may serve as a rubric for Islamic schools to renew their conceptions of Islamic education for a deeper connection between religious education as a subject and pedagogy rooted in a religious tradition.

Keywords

Islamic pedagogy Philosophy of Islamic education Principles of Islamic education 

Bibliography

  1. Ajem, Ramzy, and Memon, Nadeem. Principles of Islamic Pedagogy: A Teacher’s Manual. Toronto, Canada: Razi Education, 2011.Google Scholar
  2. al-Attas, Naquib. The Concept of Education in Islam. First World Conference on Muslim Education, March 1977. Mecca: Saudi Arabia, 1980.Google Scholar
  3. al-Ghazali, Abu Hamid Muhammad ibn Muhammad. On Vigilance and Self-Examination (Kitab al muraqaba wa’l muhasaba) Book XXXVIII of the Revival of the Religious Sciences (Ihya ulum al-din). Translated with introduction and notes by Anthony Shaker. United Kingdom: Islamic Texts Society, 2015.Google Scholar
  4. al-Ghazali. “O Son!” In Classical Foundations of Islamic Educational Thought, ed. Bradley Cook, 88–107. Utah: Brigham Young University Press, 2010.Google Scholar
  5. al-Qabisi. “A Treatise Detailing the Circumstances of Students and the Rules Governing Teachers and Students.” In Classical Foundations of Islamic Educational Thought, ed. Bradley Cook, 38–74. Utah: Brigham Young University Press, 2010.Google Scholar
  6. al-Ramli, Muhammad bin Ahmed. Educating Children: Classical Advice for Modern Times (Riyadatul Sibyan). United Kingdom: Kitaba—Islamic Texts for the Blind, 2013.Google Scholar
  7. al-Zarnuji. Instruction of the Student: The Method of Learning. Trans. G.E. Von Grunebaum and Theodora M. Abel. Chicago, IL: Starlatch Press, 2003.Google Scholar
  8. ———. “Instruction of the Student: The Method of Learning.” In Classical Foundations of Islamic Educational Thought, ed. Bradley Cook, 108–155. Utah: Brigham Young University Press, 2010.Google Scholar
  9. al Zeera, Zahra. Wholeness and Holiness in Education: An Islamic Perspective. Virginia: The International Institute on Islamic Thought, 2001.Google Scholar
  10. Amr Abdalla et al. Improving the Quality of Islamic Education in Developing Countries: Innovative Approaches. Washington, DC: Creative Associates International, 2006.Google Scholar
  11. Burckhardt, Titus. “Traditional Sciences in Fez.” In Education in the Light of Tradition, ed. Jane Casewit, 17–22. Bloomington, IN: World Wisdom, 2011.Google Scholar
  12. Chittick, William. “The Goal of Islamic Education.” In Education in the Light of Tradition, ed. Jane Casewit, 85–92. Bloomington, IN: World Wisdom, 2011.Google Scholar
  13. Gunther, Sebastian. “‘Your Educational Achievements Shall Not Stop Your Efforts to Seek Beyond’: Principles of Teaching and Learning in Classical Arabic Writings.” In Philosophies of Islamic Education: Historical Perspectives and Emerging Discourses, ed. Nadeem A. Memon and Mujadad Zaman, 72–93. New York: Routledge, 2016.Google Scholar
  14. Hardaker, Glenn, and Aishah Sabki. Islamic Pedagogy and Embodiment: An Anthropological Study of a British Madrasah. International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, 2012. Available at http://eprints.hud.ac.uk/12841/.
  15. Ibn Jama’ah. “A Memorandum for Listeners and Lecturers: Rules of Conduct for the Learned and the Learning.” In Classical Foundations of Islamic Educational Thought, ed. Bradley Cook, 156–207. Utah: Brigham Young University Press, 2010.Google Scholar
  16. Ibn Khaldun. The Muqaddimah (an Introduction). Damascus: Dar Ya’rub, 2004.Google Scholar
  17. ———. “Selections from The Muqaddimah.” In Classical Foundations of Islamic Educational Thought, ed. Bradley Cook, 208–242. Utah: Brigham Young University Press, 2010.Google Scholar
  18. Ibn Sahnun. “The Book of Rules of Conduct for Teachers.” In Classical Foundations of Islamic Educational Thought, ed. Bradley Cook, 1–19. Utah: Brigham Young University Press, 2010.Google Scholar
  19. Michon, Jean-Louis. Introduction to Traditional Islam: Foundations, Art, and Spirituality. Bloomington, IN: World Wisdom, 2008.Google Scholar
  20. Miskawayh. “From the Second Discourse of The Refinement of Character.” In Classical Foundations of Islamic Educational Thought, ed. Bradley Cook, 75–87. Utah: Brigham Young University Press, 2010.Google Scholar
  21. Nasr, Seyyed Hossein. Traditional Islam in the Modern World. London and New York: Kegan Paul International, 1990.Google Scholar
  22. ———. Man and Nature. Chicago, IL: ABC International Group, 1997.Google Scholar
  23. ———. A Young Muslim’s Guide to the Modern World. Kuala Lumpur: Islamic Book Trust, 2010.Google Scholar
  24. Qureshi, Omar Anwar. “Disciplinarity and Islamic Education.” In Philosophies of Islamic Education: Historical Perspectives and Emerging Discourses, ed. Nadeem A. Memon and Mujadad Zaman, 94–111. New York: Routledge, 2016.Google Scholar
  25. Sahin, Abdullah. New Directions in Islamic Education: Pedagogy and Identity Formation. Turkey: KUBE, 2013.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.CITE-School of Education – University of South AustraliaMagill-AdelaideAustralia
  2. 2.College of Education – Zayed UniversityDubaiUnited Arab Emirates

Personalised recommendations