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Muslim Schools in Australia: Development and Transition

  • Jan A. AliEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Islamic education is underpinned by the inseparability of knowledge and the sacred. With this Islamic ethos, Muslim schools emerged in Australia to give Muslim children access to empowering forms of knowledge, to refine their religious identity and to inculcate in them Islamic moral and ethical comportment. However, the global pervasiveness of neo-liberalism as an economic philosophy brought about fundamental changes to the way Muslim schools operate and empower their students with knowledge. Muslim communities have seen schools transform and transition from a Utopian Muslim School Model to a Corporate Muslim School Model.

Keywords

Islamisation of knowledge Muslim school Neo-liberalism 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Western Sydney UniversityPenrithAustralia

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