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Introduction: New Directions in Third Wave HCI

  • Michael FilimowiczEmail author
  • Veronika Tzankova
Chapter
Part of the Human–Computer Interaction Series book series (HCIS)

Abstract

New Directions in 3rd Wave Human-Computer Interaction explores the diverse interdisciplinary inquiries comprising the forefront of developments in the field of HCI. This wide ranging collection aims at understanding the design, methods and applications of emerging forms of interaction with new technologies and the rich varieties of human knowledge and experiences. All chapters are structured around two major themes presented in two volumes: Volume 1– Technologies, and Volume 2 – Methodologies.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Interactive Arts & TechnologySimon Fraser UniversitySurreyCanada
  2. 2.School of CommunicationsSimon Fraser UniversityBurnabyCanada

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