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Role of Context in Social Creativity for the Design of Digital Resources

Part of the ICME-13 Monographs book series (ICME13Mo)

Abstract

This paper presents a study of social creativity in the collaborative design of digital educational resources within a new socio-technical environment. This environment embeds a communication space for the designers, as well as an authoring tool enabling the meshing of text with dynamic digital widgets. We focus on understanding the processes of social creativity occurring in communities of interest, gathering together members from diverse communities of practice, taking the context of four socio-technical environments seriously into account. Our hitherto achieved results from the design of one digital resource in the French community of interest show a deep interconnectedness between emergent creativity and contextual issues.

Keywords

  • Mathematics teachers’ resources
  • Socio-technical environment
  • Collective design
  • Social creativity
  • Digital resources

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Notes

  1. 1.

    The focus was both on social creativity of groups of designers of digital media and on creative mathematical thinking (CMT) developed in their users.

  2. 2.

    Vergnaud (1990, p. 48) defines a scheme as the invariant organization of behavior for a certain class of situations.

  3. 3.

    The description of these c-books is available at http://www.mc2-project.eu/index.php/c-book.

  4. 4.

    CoICode is a communication environment integrated to the C-book technology. It allows creating a workspace within which members of a CoI engaged in collaborative design of c-books can communicate.

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Correspondence to Nataly Essonnier .

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Essonnier, N., Kynigos, C., Trgalova, J., Daskolia, M. (2018). Role of Context in Social Creativity for the Design of Digital Resources. In: Fan, L., Trouche, L., Qi, C., Rezat, S., Visnovska, J. (eds) Research on Mathematics Textbooks and Teachers’ Resources. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-73253-4_10

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-73253-4_10

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