Wearable UV Meter – An EPS@ISEP 2017 Project

  • Elin Lönnqvist
  • Marion Cullié
  • Miquel Bermejo
  • Mikk Tootsi
  • Simone Smits
  • Abel Duarte
  • Benedita Malheiro
  • Cristina Ribeiro
  • Fernando Ferreira
  • Manuel F. Silva
  • Paulo Ferreira
  • Pedro Guedes
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 715)

Abstract

This paper reports the collaborative design and development of Helios, a wearable UltraViolet (UV) meter. Helios is intended to help preventing the negative effects of over-exposure to UV radiation, e.g., sun burning, photo ageing, eye damage and skin cancer, as well as of under-exposure to solar radiation, e.g., the risk of developing vitamin D shortage. This project-based learning experience involved five Erasmus students who participated in EPS@ISEP – the European Project Semester (EPS) at Instituto Superior de Engenharia do Porto (ISEP) – in the spring of 2017. The Team, motivated by the desire to find a solution to this problem, conducted multiple studies, including scientific, technical, sustainability, marketing, ethics and deontology analyses, and discussions to derive the requirements, design structure, functional system and list of materials and components. The result is Helios, a prototype Wearable UV Meter that can be worn as both a bracelet and a clip-on. The tangible result was the Helios prototype, but more importantly was the learning experience of the Team, as concluded from their closing statements.

Keywords

Project based learning Collaborative learning Ethics and engineering education New learning models and applications European Project Semester Ultraviolet radiation Wearable UV meter 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work is financed by the ERDF – European Regional Development Fund through the Operational Programme for Competitiveness and Internationalisation – COMPETE 2020 Programme within project POCI-01-0145-FEDER-006961, and by National Funds through the FCT – Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia (Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology) as part of project UID/EEA/50014/2013.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elin Lönnqvist
    • 1
  • Marion Cullié
    • 1
  • Miquel Bermejo
    • 1
  • Mikk Tootsi
    • 1
  • Simone Smits
    • 1
  • Abel Duarte
    • 1
  • Benedita Malheiro
    • 1
  • Cristina Ribeiro
    • 1
  • Fernando Ferreira
    • 1
  • Manuel F. Silva
    • 1
  • Paulo Ferreira
    • 1
  • Pedro Guedes
    • 1
  1. 1.ISEP/PPorto – School of Engineering, Polytechnic of PortoPortoPortugal

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