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Legalize, Regulate, or Prohibit? Public Policy Dilemmas

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Abstract

This chapter examines the different policy options to address the drug problem. I discuss the merit and pitfall of three different polices. The first is legalization, which sometimes takes the form of a broad decriminalization of the different phases. The second is regulation that refers to legal measures aimed at monitoring and controlling the circulation of illegal drugs without actually legalizing (i.e., maintaining prohibition). Finally, prohibition means making drugs illegal, directing law enforcement resources toward eliminating the market for drugs, and sanctioning different actors involved in the business. I analyzed the implications of each policy.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Center for Latin American Studies on Insecurity & ViolenceNational University of Tres de FebreroBuenos AiresArgentina

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