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Introducing a Surgical Procedure for an Implantable FES Device and Its Outcome

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Part of the Biosystems & Biorobotics book series (BIOSYSROB,volume 19)

Abstract

The adult paralytic foot or drop foot is a secondary related foot deformity, which usually arises due to neurogenic damage (Kunst et al. in Stroke 42:2126–2130, 2011; Truelsen et al. in European Journal of Neurology 13:581–598, 2006). The lack of neural innervation of the muscles, which play a major role in ankle dorsiflexion—M. tibialis anterior, Mm. peronei, M. extensor digitorum longus, and M. extensor halluces longus—can cause a secondary malposition of the foot. As a dorsiflexion of the ankle cannot be actively provoked, this leads to a domination of the flexors and as a secondary outcome to a shortening of these muscles and their tendons. Similarly, it may also lead to a malposition in supination (www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/foot-drop/basics/definition/con-20032918).

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Correspondence to Kiriakos Daniilidis .

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Daniilidis, K., Jakubowitz, E., Yao, D. (2018). Introducing a Surgical Procedure for an Implantable FES Device and Its Outcome. In: Sandrini, G., Homberg, V., Saltuari, L., Smania, N., Pedrocchi, A. (eds) Advanced Technologies for the Rehabilitation of Gait and Balance Disorders. Biosystems & Biorobotics, vol 19. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-72736-3_27

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-72736-3_27

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