European Law and Criminal Justice

Chapter

Abstract

After a brief historical overview in Sect. 1.1, which outlines how the history of criminal proceedings in Europe shows an alternation of integration and regionalization, Sect. 1.2 deals with the features of EU legal system—the competences of the European Union, the legislative bodies and the legislative procedures, legal acts, the role of the Court of Justice, and the dynamics of disapplication and consistent interpretation—that are relevant for criminal justice. Section 1.3 is dedicated to the ECHR system, with special attention to the role of the European Court of Human Rights in the interpretation of ECHR law and to the obligation of the States to comply with its judgments against them. Finally, Sect. 1.4 highlights the network-like dimension of the European sources and the characteristics of European legality.

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© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of LawUniversity of PaduaPaduaItaly

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