Advertisement

The Representation of Thought

  • Joe Bray
Chapter
Part of the Language, Style and Literature book series (LSL)

Abstract

In this chapter Bray turns to a frequently-discussed aspect of Austen’s style: the way in which she represents the thoughts and feelings of her characters. While not denying the innovativeness of her use of free indirect thought (often considered to be her greatest contribution to the English novel), he argues that a full appreciation of Austen’s subtle examination of character psychology is best advanced by considering the often rapid alternations between categories of thought representation, rather than by a focus on one technique alone. Free indirect thought is often combined in particular passages with the slightly different, even more ambiguous technique of narrated perception, for example. The chapter investigates the complex blend of techniques through which the thought processes of all Austen’s heroines are represented.

Works Cited

  1. Adamson, S. 1994. From Empathetic Deixis to Empathetic Narrative: Stylisation and (De-)Subjectivisation as Processes of Language Change. Transactions of the Philological Society 92 (1): 55–88.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Austen, J. (1814) 2005a. Mansfield Park. Edited by J. Wiltshire. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  3. ———. (1816) 2005b. Emma. Edited by R. Cronin and D. McMillan. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  4. ———. (1818) 2006a. Persuasion. Edited by J. Todd and A. Blank. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  5. ———. (1811) 2006c. Sense and Sensibility. Edited by E. Copeland. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  6. ———. (1813) 2006d. Pride and Prejudice. Edited by P. Rogers. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  7. ———. (1818) 2006e. Northanger Abbey. Edited by B.M. Benedict and D. Le Faye. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  8. Banfield, A. 1981. Reflective and Non-Reflective Consciousness in the Language of Fiction. Poetics Today 2 (2): 61–76.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Brinton, L. 1980. Represented Perception: A Study in Narrative Style. Poetics 9: 363–381.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Cohn, D. 1966. Narrated Monologue: Definition of a Fictional Style. Comparative Literature 18 (2): 97–112.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Fehr, B. 1938. Substitutionary Narration and Description: A Chapter in Stylistics. English Studies 20: 97–107.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Fludernik, M. 1993. The Fictions of Language and the Languages of Fiction: The Linguistic Representation of Speech and Consciousness. London and New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  13. Hernadi, P. 1972. Dual Perspective: Free Indirect Discourse and Related Techniques. Comparative Literature 24 (1): 32–43.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Johnson, C. 1988. Jane Austen: Women, Politics and the Novel. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  15. Leech, G.N., and M.H. Short. 1981. Style in Fiction: A Linguistic Introduction to English Fictional Prose. Harlow: Longman.Google Scholar
  16. Leech, G., and M. Short. 2007. Style in Fiction: A Linguistic Introduction to English Fictional Prose. 2nd ed. Harlow: Pearson.Google Scholar
  17. Pallarés Garcia, E. 2012. Narrated Perception Revisited: The Case of Jane Austen’s Emma. Language and Literature 21 (2): 170–188.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Pinch, A. 1996. ‘Strange Fits of Passion’: Epistemologies of Emotion; Hume to Austen. Stanford: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
  19. Semino, E., and M. Short. 2004. Corpus Stylistics: Speech, Writing and Thought Presentation in a Corpus of English Writing. London and New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  20. Sutherland, K. 2005a. Chronology of Composition and Publication. In Jane Austen in Context, ed. J. Todd, 12–22. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joe Bray
    • 1
  1. 1.School of EnglishUniversity of SheffieldSheffieldUK

Personalised recommendations