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Gender Differences in Mohs Micrographic Surgery

  • Yoav C. Metzger
Chapter

Abstract

Gender differences in Mohs micrographic surgery stem from various gender specific characteristics, including lifestyle, psychosocial and behavioral differences, sun exposure patterns and aesthetic concerns. These differences lead to variations in the tumor biology and anatomy of skin cancer. In addition, patient preferences and physician gender based biases influence the therapeutic approach and outcome of MMS in the different genders.

Keywords

Mohs surgery Micrographic surgery Margin controlled surgery Surgical dermatology Gender differences Gender medicine Surgery outcomes Physician bias Cancer prevalence Cancer demographics Tumor biology Tumor location 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yoav C. Metzger
    • 1
  1. 1.The Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical CenterTel AvivIsrael

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