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Diaspora Investment and African National Economies: Case Studies

  • Gift Mugano
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies of Entrepreneurship in Africa book series (PSEA)

Abstract

This chapter discusses the impact of diaspora investment in the receiving countries. The chapter builds on two selected cases that represent significant government initiatives in Africa. These cases are used to exemplify the way in which effective diaspora mobilisation can help development. The case of Ethiopia is particularly enlightening since it sets in context the weight that creative government structure such as diaspora bond can have on development initiatives in one of the poorest countries in the world. The Tunisian case that is explored in the chapter equally exemplifies the issues that a government can face when taking the lead in formalising frameworks for diaspora contributions to national economies and development effort. The chapter then pulls together the learning that derives from the two examples which could inform other future transnational diaspora-COO cooperation initiatives.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Nelson Mandela Metropolitan UniversityPort ElizabethSouth Africa

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