The European Commission’s Approach to Film Funding: Striking a Difficult Balance

Chapter
Part of the Media Business and Innovation book series (MEDIA)

Abstract

Audiovisual works, in particular films, play an important role in shaping European identities and reflecting the EU’s cultural diversity. This chapter looks at the European Commission’s activities in relation to public film funding. It begins with a historic overview of the objectives of the European Commission in its approach to the audiovisual sector. It then turns to the concrete realizations of the Commission via its own funding programmes (the MEDIA programme) as well as through its State aid control of Member States’ financing schemes.

The chapter continues with a discussion of the digital transition, emphasizing the possibilities this may bring with it for the Commission to realize a more ambitious programme for the European film sector. However, various and sometimes opposing digital trends are added to an existing set of challenges. Therefore, the chapter concludes with a reality check in terms of what the Commission’s role in shaping the digital European film sector can amount to. The stated objective of realizing a digital single market for films does not seem to be achievable without giving up the carefully struck balance between the different (industrial and cultural, national and European) interests around the table. For the time being, the European film market looks to remain complex and fragmented.

Keywords

Creative Europe Digitalization European Commission MEDIA programme Policy objectives State aid control Policy impact Audiovisual sector Public film funding 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.European CommissionBrusselsBelgium
  2. 2.Vrije Universiteit BrusselBrusselsBelgium

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